How to take cuttings from passion flowers

How to take cuttings from passion flowers

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When taking cuttings from passion flowers you have a choice of taking softwood cuttings which you can take in spring or semi-ripe cutting you can take in autumn. Both cuttings are fairly easy to get to root and grow. Cutting can be taken and kept in a propagator or simply covered with a clear plastic bag of the pot. In my guide, I explain the difference here and how to take and grow each of them.

Taking cutting from passion flower from new spring shoots

Taking softwood cuttings from passion flowers

You take softwood cuttings from the soft and new young shoot tips, these are more likely to rot off but success if done correctly is usually good, and they are the first cuttings you can take. These appear in spring and summer (April to June) and are this year’s new growth. They take root easily and grow quickly.

I always water the plants you are going to take cutting from the day before to make sure there hydrated well.

Take cuttings from passion flowers

  1. Clean your pruning shears or garden scissors.
  2. Go out early in the morning (when the plant is still full of water and firm).
  3. Choose shoots that don’t have flowers on them.
  4. Cut off a shoot; make the cut above a bud on the plant:
  5. Place all the cuttings in a plastic bag. If you can’t prepare the cuttings further at this time, place the bag in the fridge. Personally I make sure I can plant the cutting straight away.

Prepare cuttings

  1. Trim each cutting below a node at the bottom end so that it’s 5cm to 10cm long.
  2. Take off the lower leaves and pinch off the soft tip.
  3. Dip the base of the cutting in hormone rooting liquid or powder (optional but recommended).

Scroll down to ‘All Cutting’ to carry on with the guide for potting the cuttings

Stunning passion flower grown from cuttings from semi-ripe cuttings

Taking semi-ripe cuttings

These are cuttings taken from stems that have grown this season. July to September is the best time to take these. The best stems to take cuttings of have a firm base and a soft tip. These also root quickly.

Take cuttings

  1. Clean your pruning shears or garden scissors.
  2. Go out early in the morning (when the plant is still full of water and firm).
  3. Choose shoots that don’t have flowers on them.
  4. Cut off 20cm of a shoot; make the cut above a bud on the plant.
  5. Place all the cuttings in a plastic bag. If you can’t prepare the cuttings further at this time, place the bag in the fridge.

Prepare cuttings

  • Trim each cutting, cutting just below a leaf node at the bottom, so that it’s 10cm to 15cm in length.
  • Remove the lowest leaves and pinch off the soft tip. Leave about four leaves on the stem. If the leaves are large, cut them in half. This reduces water loss.
  • Dip the base of the cutting in hormone rooting liquid or powder (optional but recommended).

All cuttings

Pot cuttings

  1. Prepare a tray with seed/cuttings compost or multi-purpose compost. Mix in some sand or perlite to ensure good drainage.
  2. Make holes in the compost and put the base of a cutting into each hole. Make sure that the first pair of leaves on the cutting is just above the surface.
  3. When you’ve planted all the tray, water everything from above.
  4. Cover the pots with a plastic bag and seal them or place them inside a propagator with a lid.
  5. Make several slits in the bag to let in the air.

Look after the cuttings

Place the tray in good but indirect sunlight. Make sure the sunlight is diffused.

Keep the compost moist until the cuttings take root. This should be in two to four weeks. Make sure to remove any diseased or dead cuttings when you notice them to avoid spreading diseases.

If you notice a build-up of moisture in the bag, open it up for a while to decrease the humidity inside. If you have them in a propagator, you can open the vents to improve airflow. Once the cuttings have rooted, harden them off for about two weeks. Then pot them individually into new pots and grow on further, I usually use 9cm/6 inch pots. I usually plant them outdoors the following spring and keep them in a greenhouse or cold frame over winter.

You can learn more about growing passion flowers here, and if you want to grow them in pots you can see my guide on growing passion flowers in pots.

When it comes to pests and diseases, I also discuss these here, and although not essential, you can learn how to prune them here.

Passion flowers can also suffer from yellowing leaves and wilting which I have also covered in this guide.


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